Why Do Scuba Divers Dive Backwards?

Scuba diving is a super fun sport that can allow you the ability to see the underwater world that many people never have the opportunity to see in all its glory.

That being said, scuba diving can also be incredibly dangerous and difficult, especially if you are not taking the right precautions.

And have you ever noticed that scuba divers always go into the boat backwards?

They look like they’re just falling off a boat backwards into the water.

Want to know why they do that? Keep reading!

Why Do Scuba Divers Enter The Water Backwards?

The simple answer to this question is safety.

It is helpful to look at an example to better understand why diving backward is safer than just diving right in.

If you have ever dove into a pool while wearing goggles this concept should be easier to understand.

The direction and the force at which you hit the water makes a huge difference in how secure your goggles are.

If you hit the water straight on, it is likely that your goggles are going to become dislodged.

If you hit the water at a slight angle, your goggles are more likely to stay intact.

The same concept applies to scuba diving.

When a diver enters the water they do so backward as a means of being able to hold on to their gear and make sure that it stays where it need to while they are entering the water.

This allows them also to keep the lines of their gear straight to avoid kinks and interruptions in air flow while they are under the water.

On top of that, it is also easier to signify trouble if something happens within the first few seconds in the water than it would be if they entered face first and had to make a gull turn.

scuba diver off boat

What is the Technique Called?

The method for scuba divers entering the water is called the backward roll.

It is more than just falling into the water backward.

This method requires some skill and practice to be able to do so correctly and to make sure that you are going to be safe while entering the water.

You first need to place your right hand on the regulator of your gear and then use your fingers to help keep your mask in place.

Your left hand is most commonly used help keep the hoses straight and to keep them from tangling.

You also need to tuck your chin to your chest.

What Does the Backward Roll Do?

This method helps to protect you and your gear in a few different ways.

Diving straight into the water is going to be more dangerous for your body itself, it can cause injury to the legs, the arms can cause you to become disoriented in the water.

Jumping straight in is harder on the joints and on the body than gently rolling into the water.

Another issue is that jumping straight in is going to be harder on your equipment as well.

Scuba equipment is very sensitive and very highly tuned to be able to help keep you safe while you are under the water.

Jumping in can cause you not only to lose gear, but also to damage the gear that you are using making your dive far less safe and far more difficult as well.

You can also help to minimize movement of your boat by gently rolling back into the water rather than jumping straight in and just going for it.

Is This The Only Method for Entry?

The answer to this question, is no.

You can enter the water however you see fit, this is just the preferred and generally agreed upon safest method for scuba divers to enter the water.

It is suitable for experienced divers, for those that have gone on multiple dives, and even for those that are highly experienced and that have been diving for years.

This method of entry is generally agreed upon by professionals as the best method for entering the water to keep you, your gear and the boat safe during your dive.

No matter what method you personally use for entry, safety is always the most important factor.

And you should be taking the time to make sure you take all the appropriate safety measures to make sure your dive is going to not only be successful, but that every diver is going to make it back to the boat without incident.

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