Can You Glue Your Boot Sole Back On With Gorilla Glue? (Quick Hiking Shoes Fix)

hiking boot sole separation

We’ve all got that one pair of hiking boots that we just don’t want to part with. They’re old and well worn, but still comfortable and reliable on the trail.

Until one day when you’re out trekking and the sole comes apart from the rest of the boot.

What do you do?

Can you save this beloved pair of hiking boots? Or will you have to buy a new pair?

Don’t give up on those old boots yet just because they’re falling apart at the soles. We’ve got some tips on extending their life with a bit of Gorilla Glue.

Yup, you can use Gorilla Glue to glue your boot sole back on so that you won’t have to buy a new pair of boots. And it works!

Keep reading to learn more.

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Does Gorilla Glue Really Work To Repair Boots?

Yes, you really can use Gorilla Glue to repair that old pair of hiking boots.

The truth is that industrial shoe glue is what was originally used on the boots, and if you take them to a shoe cobbler then he will also use shoe glue.

But here’s a little secret – Gorilla Glue is just as effective at shoe glue for putting the sole back on your boot.

Sounds too good to be true? Well, it’s got a little something to do with the ingredients of Gorilla Glue.

You see, regular glue just won’t work, but Gorilla Glue has polyurethane in it that gives the glue a flexibility that you don’t get with regular glue.

And that flexibility is vital for repairing shoes.

Gorilla Glue also dries super quick and its waterproof. Honestly, I use it around the house for all kinds of DIY projects!

A user of Stack Exchange had this to say about it:

My Merrell boots came apart like yours after a few years. I glued the soles back on with Gorilla Glue (original version, amber polyurethane) and they’re still holding strong after several more years. If you use this glue, be sure to follow the directions and moisten one of the surfaces with water before gluing.

Some people doing DIY boot repair have noted that Gorilla Glue expands when it cures, so you need to exercise caution when initially applying the glue.

Which Gorilla Glue Is Best For Boot Repair?

As you may have noticed, there are a lot of different varieties of Gorilla Glue on the market right now.

And if you’re not careful, then you’ll end up with something that isn’t ideal for hiking boots or other outdoor shoes.

Based on our experience and usages of a variety of Gorilla Glue options, the Gorilla Clear Grip Contact Adhesive is the best option for boot repair.

Gorilla Clear Grip Contact Adhesive, Waterproof, 3 ounce, Clear, (Pack of 2)

What makes this one the best?

  • It’s waterproof
  • It’s flexible
  • It dries fast
  • It doesn’t run when applied

Some outdoor stores actually carry this glue, or you can buy it online at Amazon.

How To Fix Sole Separation On Your Boot

If the sole of your boot just separated from the rest of the shoe, then you can use Gorilla Glue to get that sucker back together.

You’ll want to follow the directions on the Gorilla Glue for the best results.

The basic directions are to clean the inside of the sole and the part of the boot where the sole attaches and then apply a thin layer of glue on the inside of the sole.

Press the two together and apply the necessary pressure for the prescribed amount of time.

And, voila you’ve just done some quick sole repair on your boots!

Just be sure that you don’t apply too much glue cause it’ll ooze out when you firmly attach the two piece of the boot together to set the glue.

How To Fix Holes In Sole On Your Boot

A common problem that hiking boot owners encounter is just a hole in the sole. So, not completely separated, but a hole.

Luckily, you can easily fill that hole with some Gorilla Glue.

You’ll want to follow the directions on the Gorilla Glue for the best results.

The basic instructions are to clean off the area where you have the hole then apply a small amount of glue in the hole. Try to rub it into the hole with something like a toothpick.

Gorilla Glue expands a little as it sets, so don’t apply too much at first. You can always apply more if you don’t end up with enough the first time.

Final Word

You should always carry a small tube of Gorilla Glue in your pack in case you have to do some shoe repair on the trail. 

There’s a lot of different types of Gorilla Glue, but Active Weekender recommends the Gorilla Clear Grip Contact Adhesive variety as your best bet for DIY shoe glue repair.

Keep in mind that you can always take your shoes to a cobbler once you get back from the trail, if you’re worried about your own DIY shoe repair skills.

image: StackExchange

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